PhD position for Chemical Emission-Emotion Relationships (CHEER)

Job offer from February 09, 2017

This project introduces a new and exciting focus area for human breath, computer science and air chemistry research:  using analyses of atmospheres surrounding groups of people (or even large crowds) to deduce volatile responses to external stimuli. This type of research has only now become pragmatic with the development of highly specific real-time mass dependent instrumentation and sophisticated data mining techniques, both of which are currently available on campus at the Institute for Computer Science (University of Mainz) and the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry. The questions we want to address in this project are: do human beings breathe out volatile chemicals in response to specific emotional stimuli, which chemical species respond most strongly, how are they generated in the body, and can they be detected by others?

The PhD student would

1) measure in a cinema showing specially selected films with strong, well defined emotional moments.

 2) collect in parallel audience bio-data (heart rate, temperature, facial expression, sweating rate, muscle twitching).

3) Systematically analyze the combined dataset using state of the art data mining techniques to identify all codependencies,

4) Test whether the best codependencies can be detected by others.

The candidate should be suitably qualified to be eligible to study for a PhD (e.g. MSc or equivalent). Experience with air chemistry, plant science, organic chemistry and/or gas chromatography - mass spectrometry would be an advantage.

Please send your motivation letter, CV and certificates to Prof. Jonathan Williams (MPI-C) and Prof. Stefan Kramer (JGU Mainz).

Dr. Jonathan Williams, MPI-C

Prof. Dr. Stefan Kramer, Institute of Computer Science, JGU Mainz